Tales from the Unexpected

tales-unexpected-cover

What’s a nice author like you doing in a collection like this?

Tales from the Unexpected provides a truly eerie reading experience, by collecting together uncanny and supernatural stories … by authors famous for writing very different genres. Fans of Cranford will find a gothic tale by Mrs Gaskell inside, whilst anyone who knows and loves the Mapp and Lucia novels might be surprised by E.F. Benson’s contribution to the ghost story tradition. We’ve found Jerome K. Jerome taking a break from the Three Men in a Boat to yarn about grudges from beyond the grave, whilst Edith Nesbit and Louisa May Alcott are vying with each other to tell tales of which Professor Bhaer would definitely disapprove.

Taliessin through Logres

We’ve recently published the second of Charles William’s collections of Arthurian poetry.

In them, Charles Williams, a friend and comrade of C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien, weaves his own version of the legends of King Arthur with his imaginative accounts of Byzantium and Christendom.

Dense, subtle and full of astonishing turns of phrase, the poems bring together history, theology, myth and literature in a prodigious work of intellect and imagination. Their style varies from ringing rhymes and cunningly wrought stanzas, to alliterative lines recalling Anglo-Saxon poetry, as Williams retells the stories that have inspired writers from Malory to Tennyson to Zimmer Bradley.

Over at Quite Irregular, Jem Bloomfield has written a post about Taliessin through Logres.

Region of the Summer Stars begins: the theme is what was anciently called the Matter of Britain; that is, the reign of King Arthur in Logres and the Achievement of the Grail … The time historically is after the conversion of the Empire to Christianity but during the expectation of the Return of Our Lord (the Parousia).

It’s the beginning of a gripping, readable set of poems about the Matter of Britain.

The stars vanished; they gone, the illumined dusk
under the spell darkened to the colour of porphyry,
the colour of the stair of Empire and the womb of woman,
and the rich largesse of the Emperor; within was a point,
deep beyond or deep within Logres,
as if it had swallowed all the summer stars

The Three Clerks, Anthony Trollope

the clerks

As a press, you could say we’re very keen on Trollope, which is why we’re able to select some of the more page-turning of his oeuvre to put out in Erewash editions.

Our latest, The Three Clerks, is no exception. It is, perhaps unsurprisingly, a tale of three clerks. Yet as Trollope’s most autobiographical novel, there’s much more going on. Like any good Trollope novel, there are love interests and intrigues as well as debts and fortunes to be won or written off.

Jem has written more on clerks and clerking over at Quite Irregular and in the introduction to this edition.